Thursday, August 15, 2019

WILL I CELEBRATE MOM'S BIRTHDAY?



WILL I CELEBRATE MOM"S BIRTHDAY?

My mom will be turning 95 years old on August 24th and I do not understand how or why she is still alive. She sits with her eyes shut closed, occasionally nodding her head, while weighing only 81 lbs.  I wonder is it that her constitution is so strong, or as the nurses say, "it's not yet g-ds will". I am not a religious person yet I if g-d has anything to do with this I find it terribly troubling that anyone in my mother’s state would still be alive.

This past winter after spending time with her for several months, my family and I were certain that she would pass away within a few months. We are now 5 months later, and it is heart wrenching  thinking of her nonexistence. I pray that she is not suffering.

Unfortunately, the nursing home, aware of moms no intake of food, has increased her daily supplement from one time a day to three times a day and also added an extra protein. This of course will not keep mom alive, yet it is slowing down her departure. After questioning the staff, we were told that by Florida state law they had to provide an oral nutrient as long as my mother would still take it. 

They might have felt this was humane yet we felt that it was quite inhumane, especially since my mother literally spelt out her wishes; stating that if she had an incurable brain disease that she did not want …..etc. It's tragic that I was able to be kinder to my dogs so they could have as little suffering as possible while reaching the end of their lives.

I have recently been invited to two birthday celebrations this year. One is a dear friend’s mother who just turned 90 and the others mother will be 100. I realize how fortunate they both are and if my mom were in their health, I would wish for her to live "forever". Unfortunately and sadly enough, this is not my mother's situation.

So, as my mother's birthday approaches I can celebrate the life she once had, yet I can no longer wish her a happy birthday.



"Letter To My Mom" & My Mom My Hero are both available on Amazon worldwide. Ebook, Audio, Paperback.
https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=lisa+hirsch

Wednesday, July 10, 2019

MY MOM


My Mom

It's been a while since I have shared about my mom. It has been a long journey since she got Alzheimer's; one that I will never forget. These past 14 years have been filled with many different emotions, from unconditional love to friendship and laughter, as well as feeling helpless and an overwhelming sadness.

The picture of mom that I have chosen was taken approximately 7 years ago when she first arrived at the nursing home. It brings me back to a time that mom and I were feeling "happy". The more recent pictures that I have from the last few years, all though touching, can also be upsetting. My son Logan is now 31 years old and has a beard. Six weeks ago he became a father for the first time to the sweetest baby boy.

I profoundly remember my mother sharing with me after my son Logan was born how much and how deep her love for him was. I never truly understood that until now.
It's absolutely amazing how much love I now feel for my own grandchild. How I wish that I could share this with her and tell her that she is a "great"grandmother.

Sadly enough she is not aware of this or,"most likely",anything at all.. I use the word "most likely" since in my heart when I hold her hand, kiss her face and tell her how much I love her I believe (or want to believe) that she knows it's me. The nurses have shared this joyful news with her and with her eyes shut closed she just nods her head.

For quite some time now her eyes remain closed. She barely eats anything and seems to be "surviving" on 3 protein drinks and supplements that the nursing home gives her. Something that they are not willing to stop given the laws of Florida. Mom now weighs 82 pounds and is on hospice. The nurse tells me that she is slowly declining and, it is all in g-ds hands. I am not a religious person, so I am not sure whose hands it's in, yet somehow my mother has a very strong constitution.

Mom will turn 95 years old on August 24th of this year. My wish for her, which is something I have wished for quite a few months, is for her to peacefully go to sleep. Truthfully, this would be the best gift that I could give her. I love my mom dearly yet the life she has been living is no way for anyone to live.

Nursing homes, regardless of someone's wishes, will do whatever they legally can to keep the patient alive. It's sad and, after feeling so helpless for some time, now I think that I have just become "accepting" to the whole situation.

Today I just wanted to touch base with all my wonderful supportive friends that I have made over the last nine years in the world of Dementia. Each of our lives have been touched in many different ways but the one thing that we all have in common and share is the understanding of what this horrific disease is all about.


Sending all of you a big warm hug and thank you for always being there.




"Letter To My Mom" & My Mom My Hero are both available on Amazon worldwide. Ebook, Audio, Paperback.
https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=lisa+hirsch

 

Thursday, May 30, 2019

IF MOM COULD ONLY SPEAK...

 



IF MOM COULD ONLY SPEAK...                                                                               Year 2019

My husband and I arrived in Florida this past January to, once again, spend some valuable time with my mother. We were greatly taken back when we realized how advanced her Alzheimer's had become. Mom's eyes remained constantly closed as she sat slumped over in her wheelchair. Her face remained expressionless and we witnessed her refusal of any food.

After several days I recalled what I had read the year before in mom's Heath Care Directive. As her daughter and surrogate I knew that I had to do whatever was humanly possible to carry out her wishes.

I phoned the attorney's office who, in 2007 in the state of Florida, drew up mom's directive. She redid it shortly after her younger brother passed away from Alzheimer's. After the attorneys reviewed it they advised me to reach out to hospice which I immediately did.

We met someone from hospice who felt that they could help us. They were going to take mom that evening to their facility to give her "comfort care". After some confusion with the nursing home, hospice realized that presently they could not do this. They too had to comply with the laws of Florida.

After she read moms directive we were at least fortunate to have gained the total support from the medical director of hospice . She said that she never read anyone's wishes spelled out so clearly, yet we still had many roadblocks momentarily in our way.

That evening I had a restless night’s sleep and in the morning my heart remained hopeful that we would be able to succeed in carrying out moms’ wishes.

There was no way that I would give up trying so we decided to approach the administration at the nursing home. I respectfully pleaded with them as I shared what my mother wished for, which was all legally documented. Mom's proxy was sent to their legal department and given the laws of Florida, once again we were told that there was not much they could do.

As mom started to lose more weight the doctor from the nursing home put her on 3 supplements (i.e. Ensure) and protein drinks a day. We tried to stop these drinks, yet the nursing home would not again abide to her or our wishes. Although they were compassionate and understanding I quickly realized that nursing homes are focused on keep their patients alive.

I am trying to accept what has transpired in the last few months. As one can only imagine it is very difficult. I have endured heartache watching my mother as she succumbs to this horrific disease. All I really want is for her to go to sleep as peacefully as possible.

I whole heartedly believe in "Death with Dignity" also known as assisted suicide. I believe that one has the right to leave this world when they are suffering and know the inevitable. When there is no longer any quality left in one’s life it should be their given right to decide when they wish to peacefully pass on.

Currently eight states have passed a bill allowing one to end their lives in this way. I know that this is a long battle yet as soon as New York State passes this bill, which I hope will be soon, I am committed to fight for the rights of those with Dementia. Even in the states that have passed aid in dying having Alzheimer's is not included, even if one's wishes were stated prior to when they no longer could speak for themselves.

I will begin in New York because that is where I reside. If I can help get it passed here, which would probably take years, then hopefully other states will follow. This is my mission not only for my myself, if I were to get Alzheimer's, but for all the others who suffer from this disease. Maybe one day this bill will be called "Ruthie's Law". An honor that my mom would be proud of.

This is my commitment and something I hope that many of you will join with me in this battle! Not only would I have wanted this for my mother, it is something that I wish for my loved ones and myself. It's called the freedom of choice!

If Mom could only speak what would she say...……..



"Letter To My Mom" & My Mom My Hero are both available on Amazon worldwide. Ebook, Audio, Paperback.
https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=lisa+hirsch




Friday, January 4, 2019

CAN WE SAY GOODBYE ?




CAN WE SAY GOODBYE?

My mother was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s Disease at the age of 80. For the first several years of her illness, she was able to live at home with part-time caregivers. Approximately six years ago, her cognitive functioning deteriorated and we moved her into a nursing home. Fourteen years after her diagnosis, my mother who is now 94 except for her macular degeneration, is on no medication for any life-threatening conditions.

Several months ago, two members in my Alzheimer’s group suddenly lost their mothers, even though they joined the group after me. Every time this happened I questioned, why my mom was still alive after having dementia for so many years?

I know how that sounds. But please let me explain. When she was first diagnosed, even though we had had a strained relationship, I fell in love with her unconditionally. I devoted myself to managing her care and our relationship flourished. Any ambivalent feelings that I once had no longer seemed important and magically disappeared. We shared our laughter and acted so silly almost as if we were teenagers. But today, after 14 years with Alzheimer’s, things with mom are quite different.

What kind of life can mom now possibly have? She exists, but does she really? She no longer has any appreciation of any of the beautiful things that once surrounded her world. Memories of her husband and children are all but gone. For many years, she’s had no idea of her age, her life, her family, nor even her existence.

Mom use to love to go to museums, movies and theatre. She enjoyed her morning walks or strolling on the beach. She adored reading, had a great quest for knowledge and loved taking continuing education classes. For many years now, none of these things have been a part of her life.

Today she is confined to a wheelchair with her eyes mostly shut closed. She occasionally utters a few words that none of us understand. Every part of her existence is taken care of by the wonderful caring aides in her nursing home.

If she could speak or see herself through different eyes, would she want to keep on living? I believe deep in my heart that I know her answer. The answer is what I would want for myself. I believe that when someone’s quality of life disappears, decisions need to be made.

Regardless of your beliefs I am certain that we can all agree that Alzheimer’s is one of the cruelest diseases. It takes away one’s entire world as if it never existed. There is no cure and the ending can be gruesome. So, I ask you, should someone with Alzheimer’s have the right to choose to die? In several states with other diseases you do have that choice. One can decline treatment, but with Alzheimer’s there is no treatment and one can live for many years with no awareness nor quality of life.

Most of us choose not to speak about this yet it is something that as human beings should be our right. We should be able to make our own choice of how we live and when we should die. My choice has always been that I would die with dignity, through physician-assisted death if need be, in order to have some agency in the process. That is what I so heartily wish for my mother.

In two weeks I will be arriving in Florida where my mom is, and staying with her for eight weeks. I want to hold her hand and share with her how much I love her. I also want to let her know that it is okay for her to just "say goodbye".



 
 

Thursday, November 8, 2018

THINGS I NEVER WISH TO FORGET






THINGS I NEVER WISH TO FORGET

I get a warm fussy feeling inside as I look at the many pictures I have of my mother and family. They bring back so many memories of when we were all much younger. I remember each one vividly as if it was just yesterday. I find it difficult not to reflect on how quickly all of our lives go by.

Seeing certain photos brings back the years my mother and I had our ups and downs. Our relationship completely healed fourteen years ago after she became ill. Alzheimer's was the culprit yet because of it our relationship took on a whole new meaning. What transpired was this new undeniable, unconditional love I felt for her.

Sadly today, although mom is still alive, everything is so different. Her spirit has vanished as well as her memory. For a lady who was once whole, she is now withered away to almost little existence. She spends most of her waking hours sleeping and in the hours she is awake her world remains empty. Life, her family and the world no longer have meaning for her.

How I wish to turn back the clock for a few minutes and let my mind wander as I remember all the lovely things we once shared. The joy of my graduation in school, my marriage, the birth of my son, his graduation, his marriage and the list goes on. The trip we all took to DisneyWorld in Orlando after my dad passed away. I remember how mom loved to read and adored to travel.My parents went to Mexico, Israel and then Italy where they celebrated their 50th Anniversary. Mom loved going to museums, antiquing, theater & movies. One of my fondest memories as a child was going with my parents to visit the Statue of Liberty and Franklin D Roosevelts home in Hyde Park, N.Y.

I can still envision her smiles, her laughter and the simple little things that once gave
her pleasure. These were moments that I unfortunately just took for granted. I did not give her space  to be who she really was. Instead I focused on the negative things. I lost time not loving her for who she was. Fortunately, today my heart is only filled with deep love for her.

It's interesting for several years ago a close friend said to me that maybe my mom was always loving and I just did not see it. Now not only do I see it, I also cherish it. For these things; her smile, her warmth, her tears, her words of encouragement, her laughter are all things I pray I never will forget.

I love this little lady so deeply from the bottom of my heart!



"Letter To My Mom" & "My Mom My Hero" are both available on Amazon worldwide. Ebook, Audio, Paperback.
https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=lisa+hirsch

 

Sunday, September 2, 2018

MISSING MOM SO


MISSING MOM SO (written on July 28, 2018)


Today, July 28th, twenty-three years ago my dad passed away which left me feeling somewhat blue. I wanted so badly to speak to my mother, yet I knew that was not possible. Instead I texted my brother, shared my sadness with my husband and opened my computer to write what I was feeling. What really hit home for me was although my mom is alive I still could not share any of my feelings with her. I realized that in many ways I was somehow now an orphan or a parentless child.

What you are about to read I wrote a few weeks ago which strangely enough is so similar to what I just shared regarding my father's passing.

As I stood in front of the mirror in my bathroom removing my eye makeup I had this overwhelming feeling of how much I really missed my mom. Strangely, I felt her presence there with me. As I reminisced in my head about my earlier years I realized how she was always there for me. I might not have always thought that yet, now as I look back, I am certain of all the supportive things she always said to me.

As a teenager I was the toughest critic of myself. My hair was too curly, I complained about my nose being too long and my eyes were not large and round like my fathers. I always thought he had piercing big blues eyes similar to one of my favorite actors, Paul Newman.

With each of my insecurities my mother always tried to help in building up my confidence and self- esteem. She would tell me how pretty I was and how she wished that she was tall and "stunning" like me. My blue eyes, she said, were more exotic as they were almond shaped. She spoke words that I was just not willing to hear.

Tonight, I missed my mother more. I missed her differently. I missed her love and the lessons she tried to instill in me. I missed how she was always there for me. I missed all the years that I wasted wanting someone else's mom to be mine.

Now it is too late for her to understand all the love and respect I feel for her. How I wish that I could now share with her who I am. I want to talk to her and tell her everything that has transpired in my life. Mom knew my husband and her one and only grandchild yet today she does not recall any of us. Sadly, her life has been taken away from her.

I speak as if my mother has gone to sleep and is no longer here. In many ways unfortunately this is true.The moments that I now wish to share with her have ended for Alzheimer's has conquered. It has taken away most of who she was and has invaded her very soul. So as I said before yes, my mom is still alive yet I question, is she?



"Letter To My Mom" & My Mom My Hero are both available on Amazon worldwide. Ebook, Audio, Paperback.
https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=lisa+hirsch

Sunday, August 12, 2018

LETTER TO MY MOM





Letter To My Mom                                                      

Mom, as I sit down to write my letter I wonder how I can possibly start to share all my feelings with you. So much has changed since you developed Alzheimer’s over 14 years ago. As I gather my thoughts I realize that you will not be able to comprehend most of what I say.

As a teenager I loved you, yet somehow I wanted one of my friend’s mothers to be my mother. Then, after you became ill I fell so deeply in love with you. An unconditional love was born and since then you have inspired me each and every day.

I’m not really sure why my sentiments changed so drastically, I just know that I was given a second chance to feel a deep love and appreciation for you. As I reflect back through these years you have inspired me and have become my hero.
Your humor, your smiles, your sweetness through these difficult years have melted my heart.

Before entering the nursing home over five years ago, I spoke to you every single day. We ended each call throwing each other our kisses. I have continued to phone the nursing home only wanting to hear how you are doing. Earlier on you would take my calls and most of the time you say hello, and after a minute you just drop the phone. You did not even realize that I called or recognize the sound of my voice.

Mom, I am also a mother. My son, your only grandchild is 30 years old. You adored him and yet today you no longer remember who he is. There have been times that you think you have seven children and days when you think you have none. As a mother I cannot envision that one day I might also not know that I have a child. 

I find it hard to believe that a disease like this can wipe away your whole world as if it never existed, leaving your mind a blank canvas. Daddy passed away almost twenty four years ago and I do not believe that you have much recollection of him. I’m actually happy that he is no longer alive. I cannot imagine the pain he would have endured watching you fade away.

Today, in your world, I would have to help you brush your teeth, comb your hair, eat your food and get dressed. As a child you once did all of this for me, as well as comforting me when I was sick, or perhaps feeling a little blue.  Yet with everything that has changed, at least I know that we still have each other to share our love.

What has changed is that our roles have reversed. Now it is my turn to care for you as you once cared for me. The truth is mom that no matter whatever you can or cannot do, I am still your daughter and you will always be my mother.

Life is strange; for out of you becoming ill I have discovered a whole new world. I was given a second chance to love you unconditionally.  You have opened my heart to such a deep compassionate love. Mom as I end my letter, I just want to share with you, how very much I adore you. I feel honored and I am so proud that you are my mother.

 Your one and only daughter,

Lisa



"Letter To My Mom" & "My Mom My Hero" are both available on Amazon worldwide. Ebook, Audio & Paperback.
https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=lisa+hirsch

Friday, July 27, 2018

NEVER WANTING TO LET GO



NEVER WANTING TO LET GO

My mom has Alzheimer's for over fourteen years and as her disease progresses so does my emotions. I often feel I am on a rollercoaster swaying back and forth as it speeds around many curves shaking up my inner feelings.

This year like the past four years, I once again spent an entire month with my her. As a long distance caregiver having the opportunity to see mom more frequently brings out a more positive responses from her.

On most days we found mom with eyes closed and very little expression on her face. The sound of music that once delighted her seemed to have disappeared. One thing that is constant is that when I took her hand, even when she seemed to be sleeping, she held on tightly as if never wanting to let go.

On several occasions with eyes wide open we also found mom speaking nonstop. Although her speech is gibberish and difficult to understand it still lifted our spirits to hear her come alive. Yet amazingly enough mom said a few profound things such as "people should be happy".

I am always grateful that my wonderful husband joins me. He is so loving to mom especially when I feel a loss for words.  Magically he connects with her and finds the right things to say.

The head of nursing called me today and confirmed that mom is in the last stages of the disease, which I have heard for some time now. She reports that mom has not lost any weight and her blood work came back good. I mentioned that mom will be 94 years old in a couple of weeks. I do not know when she will finally say goodbye, yet in my heart, I do not believe that it is in the near future.

I have shared many times before that this horrific disease also fascinates me. Sometimes I question if I am now in denial or just becoming immune and accepting the situation. The once praying for mom to go to sleep has vanished and a new "space" has opened up for me.

I now feel more serene and have a calmness that is freeing. No more torturing myself of what I wish to be. I know that when mom is ready or the disease has "won", that is when I will have to say my final goodbyes. So for now, I cherish and remember how tightly our hands intertwined never wanting to let go.


"Letter To My Mom" & My Mom My Hero are both available on Amazon worldwide. Ebook, Audio & Paperback.
https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=lisa+hirsch

Sunday, July 8, 2018

MOM, IT'S MY BIRTHDAY





 MOM, IT'S MY BIRTHDAY

I will be celebrating my birthday on Thursday July 12th and I, who never made a big deal about this day, now feel differently. I find it sad that the woman who gave birth to me has no memory of this day, or in fact, any other day. Mom for the last fourteen years has been suffering from Alzheimer's.

The sorrowful part is that each year as I get older I loose a little bit more of her. Having a child of my own I cannot imagine that I might one day not remember bringing him into the world; or perhaps that I even had a child.  How could a disease like this invade one's mind and destroy a life that once was? This thought sends shock waves and chills through my entire body.

Alzheimer's is a rotten disease yet mom has been one of the more "fortunate" ones. The disease has not left her agitated and she seems to have opened her heart to more love. It is I, who feels the effects of the disease.

In mom's mind she still remembers me (and my brother) as a young child. Her mind has traveled back in time to thinking she still lives with her parents. A place and time for her that she once felt safe, loved and secure. Everything else has pretty much disappeared, so how could she in her mind now have a daughter all grown up? It's almost as if time has stood still.

Forgetting my birthday is the easy part, it's when I think about how she now lives and all the things she can no longer do, that I get upset. The simple things like getting out of bed each morning, feeding herself, getting dressed, combing her hair or brushing her teeth. These are things she no longer can do, yet I do them each morning maybe taking "life" for granted.

Mom does not realize how different her life has become because she has no memory of what her life once was. For her this is a "blessing", and for me it is being able to "accept" how things now are.

So mom, whether you can remember holding me in your arms as I took my first breath or tying my shoes as the laces came undone; this no longer matters. As long as you are not in pain and seem to be "relatively" content then I guess for now, as I blow out my birthday candles, there is not too much more that I could wish for.

I love you mom and will always be grateful that you are the mom who for many years put candles in my cakes; and as the years went by, you watched me grow up into a young lady, get married and have a child of my own.
I cannot thank my parents enough for bringing me into this world and for all the love that they gave me. I know that if mom could find the words she would surely wish me a Happy Birthday and share with me how very much she loves me. If only she could remember.


"Letter To My Mom" & My Mom My Hero are both available on Amazon worldwide. Ebook, Audio, Paperback.
https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=lisa+hirsch

Sunday, June 24, 2018

CAN ONE LIVE TOO LONG WITH ALZHIEMER'S?


CAN ONE LIVE TOO LONG WITH ALZHIEMER'S?

My mother was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s Disease at the age of 80. For the first several years of her illness, she was able to live at home with part-time caregivers. Approximately five years ago, her cognitive functioning deteriorated and we moved her into a nursing home. Fourteen years after her diagnosis, my mother is now 93(August turning 94) and except for her macular degeneration, she is on no medication for any life-threatening conditions.

Several weeks ago, two members in my Alzheimer’s group suddenly lost their mothers, even though they joined the group after me. Every time this happens I question, why my mom is still alive after having dementia for so many years?

I know how that sounds. But let me explain. When she was first diagnosed, even though we had had a strained relationship, I fell in love with her unconditionally. I devoted myself to managing her care and our relationship flourished. Any ambivalent feelings that I once had no longer seemed important and magically disappeared. We shared our laughter and acted so silly almost as if we were teenagers. But today, after 14 years with Alzheimer’s, things with mom are quite different.

What kind of life can mom now possibly have? She exists, but does she really? She no longer has any appreciation of any of the beautiful things that once surrounded her world. Memories of her husband and children are all but gone. For many years, she’s had no idea of her age, her life, her family, nor even her existence.

Mom use to love to go to museums, movies and theatre. She enjoyed her morning walks or strolling on the beach. She adored reading, had a great quest for knowledge and loved taking continuing education classes. For many years now, none of these things have been a part of her life.
Now, although she probably does not know the difference, she walks around sterile hallways passing others who are confined to wheelchairs and no longer speak. I have often said that she is the lucky one yet I now question..is she?

If she could speak or see herself through different eyes, would she want to keep on living? I believe deep in my heart that I know her answer. The answer is what I would want for myself. I believe that when someone’s quality of life disappears, decisions need to be made.

Regardless of your beliefs I am certain that we can all agree that Alzheimer’s is one of the cruelest diseases. It takes away one’s entire world as if it never existed. There is no cure and the ending can be gruesome. So, I ask you, should someone with Alzheimer’s have the right to choose to die? In several states with other diseases you do have that choice. One can decline treatment, but with Alzheimer’s there is no treatment and one can live for many years with no awareness nor quality of life.

Most of us choose not to speak about this yet it is something that as human beings should be our right. We should be able to make our own choice of how we live and when we should die. My choice has always been that I would die with dignity, through physician-assisted death if need be, in order to have some agency in the process. That is what I so heartily wish for my mother.
 
 
 


 

 
 


                                


Thursday, June 14, 2018

LONG DISTANCE CAREGIVING (INTERVIEW)


LONG DISTANCE CAREGIVING (INTERVIEW)

I was interview this week by Lori La Bey on Alzheimer's Speak about my relationship with my mother and being a long distance caregiver. I think you might find it to be quite interesting.(1 hour long)

Here is the link:  http://www.blogtalkradio.com/alzheimersspeaks/2018/06/12/long-distance-caregiving--the-struggles--gifts

Sunday, May 27, 2018

THE POWER OF TOUCH



 THE POWER OF TOUCH


I have read that physical touch is one of five ways people communicate and receive emotional love. It is also stated just reaching out and taking someone's hand can be the beginning of a journey. For me holding hands was the most tender moments that my mother and I shared during my month long visit.

As our fingers were intertwined like never before, as we held each other's hands, it felt to me as if I never wanted to let go. It was at that very moment that I became aware of how meaningful human touch was with my mother. Mom's fingers spoke words to me. They told me how much she loved me as I felt her warmth and tenderness like never before.

Every once in a while she'd open her eyes, look at me, squeeze my hand and smile. How I yearned to know what she was thinking, although on this day most of her words remained silent. Suffering for fourteen years, Alzheimer's disease has been removing her use of language.

We held each other's hands for hours as if we were young lovers. Yet this was different it was my mother that I was touching. We needed no words, just holding hands said it all. We both held on so tenderly as if never wanting to let go. Each day thereafter I hungered for my mother's touch, meaning more to me than I could have ever imagined.

I reside in New York while mom lives in Florida. Not only do I miss her deeply I very much miss the caressing of our hands. I miss her touch, her warmth her tenderness which filled my heart with love.

What does the human touch mean to you? Is it feeling the warmth and caring of another human being? Or is it perhaps feeling loved? Is it embracing another person?

Whatever it means to you, for me, it was an intimacy so different than one that I could have ever dreamed I would be able to share with my mother. It is for me a love that has come full circle and now is complete.


"Letter To My Mom" & My Mom My Hero are both available on Amazon worldwide. Ebook, Audio, Paperback.
https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=lisa+hirsch